The Bubble of Ignorance – Part 2

Okay, firstly, I hadn’t intended on publishing something twice in a row. This is my 100th post, and it’s not what I envisioned sharing. But this is the world we live in now, and I can’t make happy, woo, cutesy posts when our world is continuing to face terrible acts of injustice, murder, and hatred.

Over two years ago, I wrote and later published a post about my feelings on the so-called Islamic State.

In those two years, my knowledge and understanding about how they work has grown.

I’ve started speaking out more about them, as well as many other injustices happening around the world. Since publishing that post, I have made an effort to not live in my bubble of ignorance. I’ve started protesting and educating myself and people around me about what’s going on. I’ve become particularly passionate about what’s going on in Syria.

Okay, enough intro. Here’s my follow up on The Bubble of Ignorance, especially in the wake of the attack on the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester. Once again, it’s unedited because I just wrote it.


Here you sit, in your bubble of ignorance.

I suppose it’s better than indifference and apathy.

But you laugh at me

When I call you out.

“What more can I do?” You say, as you scroll through Facebook endlessly.

Your thoughts and prayers are with them, you say,

When in actuality,

You’re hoping that I just go away

And let you return

To your bubble of ignorance.

Because you can’t be blamed for not acting

When you simply didn’t know

About the killing

Or the drilling

Or the missing

Or the chilling scenes of death, despair, and destruction

That flood my Facebook feed, but somehow you’ve tailored your feed

To only show you things you want to see.

That’s fair,

But you know what isn’t?

That you get to sit happily in your bubble of ignorance

While PEOPLE in Syria

And around the world

Are crying

Are DYING

Are trying to get to safety.

Are risking everything for their family.

When all you risk is your “image.”

“Facebook should be about happy things,” you say.

Fine, and by the way,

Your privilege says, “Hey.”

You can’t rush away from this injustice.

Now, trust us,

You’ll be asking for trouble

If you’re caught

Sitting in your bubble

Of ignorance.

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The Bubble of Ignorance

This is a post I wrote after a particularly public beheading. I started it in February of this year. I haven’t published it because I’ve been scared to. I don’t usually share my political opinions on social media, and to be honest, I’m scared of the backlash. On social media, I’ve been silent on the events in Paris, Beirut, Nigeria, and the rest of the world. At home, I’ve cried so many times for people I’ve never met. 

When I visited Paris, I hated it. I hated how they treated the people experiencing homelessness there. I hated how that, in one part of the city, it was beautiful, but two blocks down, it was awful. I have no personal connection to anyone that’s died in an attack that I know of, but that doesn’t stop me for feeling for the families and friends of those lost. 

There has been so much violence, hate, and sadness lately, and I’ve been silent because I am speechless. I don’t know how to respond. I don’t know what to do.

I’m sharing this now because I need to for me, and I’m sharing it because it needs to be said.

I haven’t edited it, so some of the questions might have answers. 


Sometimes, it can be really easy to sit comfortably in our American Bubble of Ignorance and ignore what’s going on in the world around us.

I am not blind to the events and injustices happening in other parts of the world as well as those happening in the US. I am not blind to the events in the Middle East and the horrendous acts of violence taking place there.

The actions of the self-proclaimed “Islamic State” don’t make sense. They kill anyone they perceive to be their enemy, even their brothers and sisters in Islam. They are spreading fear and hate and without accomplishing anything other than destroying the lives of many.

I have so many questions and no answers…

Why do they continue to commit horrible acts of violence? Why can’t they be stopped?

Why does the media only help spread the fear and hate by only showing the murders they commit? Why can’t they tell us what’s going on and what the “IS” is after? Why only show the violence?

What the “Islamic State” is doing is wrong. We all understand that.

But what do we do? How can we, who so often love to sit in our Bubbles of Ignorance, stop this force from halfway around the world?

I don’t know. I really don’t know.

Hearing about what they’re doing over there whilst I sit here happily going about my life destroys me. I wish I could just wave a magic wand and make it come to an end, but the world doesn’t work that way…

Here’s what I do know.

The actions of the so-called “Islamic State” don’t represent the actions and feelings of Muslims everywhere.

Don’t allow yourself to be sucked into fearing and hating all Muslims because of the actions of the “Islamic State.” We all need to band together against them.

Until we figure out something better to do, don’t add fuel to the fire by hating and bullying others, especially because they happen to be Muslim.

Just do what’s right.

News and Nightmares

I’m one of those people who has at least one dream every night. Usually I average two or three, and I typically remember most details from them. For the most part, I have good dreams, but there was a solid two weeks where I had nothing but nightmares.

I blame the news.

My current living situation has my husband and I living with my parents until the new year, and my dad watches the news nonstop.

What has been on the news in the past couple of months? ISIS, beheadings, Ebola, plane disasters (in the local news), MH370, shootings (local and national), Ferguson, serial killers (local), and so much more.

I am not ignoring the importance of these news stories; Ebola is killing thousands of people abroad, ISIS is a horrible organization that is also killing thousands of people, there are still almost 300 people missing in the MH370 disappearance, one local father is missing in another place tragedy, racial injustice and racially-motivated deaths are still prevalent in our society. I understand the importance of bringing awareness to these and other issues. These are important issues. 

However, I have problems with how these important stories are written and presented.

When these stories are sensationalized, dehumanized, and blasted all over the television and internet, they miss out on the important conversations that need to happen about them, and they create hype and terror.

Here’s how the news affected me: I had two weeks of nightmares where planes crashed into my home, I was beheaded, and I was attacked in multiple ways. As happy as I am about the fact that I am alive and well, I would rather be having conversations about these issues rather than nightmares.

I expect the news to tell me what I need to know, not to scare me. The news should be a place I go to learn about what’s happening in the world around me and to hear important conversations about the root causes of some of the issues. I also expect the news to tell me what I can do to help improve the world around me.

I believe that every single person can make a difference in the world, as long as they are equipped with knowledge and (sometimes) given examples on what they can do to help.

10498043_10152639805621554_5540103886214924500_oFor example, Babar Suleman, a local father and pilot, went missing after the plane piloted by his son, Haris, crashed during a world-round trip to raise money and awareness for education in Pakistan. I attended the launch party for the pair, and many of my friends knew them personally. After the crash, the family launched a #BringBabarHome campaign to keep the search for Babar and the plane going as long as possible. It was a fairly successful campaign, but the searchers were not able to recover Babar. Hopefully, the searchers will continue trying to find the wreckage and bring peace of mind to the family and friends of Babar.

My point is that people have power, and there is power in numbers. With a hashtag, we were able to encourage and support the searchers for the plane, we were able to bring further awareness to the Seeds of Learning campaign they were flying for, and it gave people here, on the other side of the world, the power to make change.

No, it wasn’t the greatest or most successful campaign to ever happen; it didn’t change the world, and it hasn’t yet brought Babar back, but we took up the cause because we were empowered, not scared, by the media to do something. That is what needs to happen with all of these issues.

The media should educate the public in an unbiased and helpful way. They shouldn’t search for what will bring them the most viewers. To be frank, I honestly would watch more of the news if they did hold conversations about the root causes of violence, poverty, etc. and what we can do to help. I get that the media wants us to know what happened, but instead of telling us what happened and moving on to the important conversation, they continue to repeat what happened in different ways. That doesn’t educate me; it makes me sad, angry, and feel completely helpless.

The media should simply do the job of sharing information.

Why the media chooses to present news in a way that gives some nightmares is beyond me, but it won’t stop me from trying to learn about the important issues in the world and what I can do to make things better. However, I might have to turn off the news first.

Of course, this is just how I feel about the news. If you have anything to add to the conversation, I’d be more than happy to read it. Keep Reading!